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3 edition of leafminers Liriomyza bryoniae and L. trifolii (Diptera : Agromyzidae), their parasites and host plants found in the catalog.

leafminers Liriomyza bryoniae and L. trifolii (Diptera : Agromyzidae), their parasites and host plants

Oscar P. J. M. Minkenberg

leafminers Liriomyza bryoniae and L. trifolii (Diptera : Agromyzidae), their parasites and host plants

a revies

by Oscar P. J. M. Minkenberg

  • 19 Want to read
  • 39 Currently reading

Published by Agricultural University Wageningen in Wageningen, The Netherlands .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Liriomyza trifolii -- Biological control.,
  • Liriomyza bryoniae -- Biological control.

  • Edition Notes

    Bibliography: p. 37-50.

    StatementOscar P.J.M. Minkenberg and J.C. van Lenteren.
    SeriesAgricultural University Wageningen papers,, 86-2 (1986), Agricultural University Wageningen papers ;, 86-2.
    ContributionsLenteren, J. C. van.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsSB945.L68 M55 1986
    The Physical Object
    Pagination50 p. :
    Number of Pages50
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL2253422M
    ISBN 109067540919
    LC Control Number89130826

    Minkenberg OPJM, Van Lenteren JC. "The leafminers Liriomyza bryoniae and L. trifolii (Diptera: Agromyzidae), their parasites and host plants: a review of Agriculture." University of Wageningen Papers 1– Stegmaier CE. "Parasitic Hymenoptera bred from the family Agromyzidae (Diptera) with special reference to south Florida.". A leaf miner is any one of numerous species of insects in which the larval stage lives in, and eats, the leaf tissue of plants. The vast majority of leaf-mining insects are moths (Lepidoptera), sawflies (Symphyta, the mother clade of wasps), and flies (), though some beetles also exhibit this behavior.. Like woodboring beetles, leaf miners are protected from many predators and plant defenses.

    The polyphagous leafminers, Liriomyza bryoniae (Kaltenbach) and L. trifolii (Burgess), are important greenhouse pests in the Netherlands; L. bryoniae is long known as a pest of tomato, while L. trifolii was reported for the first time in (VAN FRANKENHUYZEN and VAN DE BUND ). ii . Common name Leaf Miners Scientific names Liriomyza trifolii, L. bryoniae, L. huidobrensis, L. cicerina, L. congesta, L. pusilla, L. pusio, L. sativae and L. strigata. Nature of damage Punctures caused by females during the feeding and oviposition processes can result in a stippled appearance on foliage, especially at the leaf tip and along the leaf [ ].

    The Liriomyza species composition in the fall of was found to be specimens of L. trifolii (Burgess), one L. sativae Blanchard, and 33 specimens were unidentifiable due to the lack of useful morphological characters. In spring , specimens were identified as L. trifolii and 23 specimens were unidentifiable. Information > Pests > Leafminer Leafminer. There are several species of diptera belonging to family Agromyzidae, among the most common are the chickpea leafminer (Liriomyza cicerina), and other species that attack ornamental and horticultural crops like Liriomyza tly, one of the most harmful leafminers in horticultural crops (indoors and outdoors) is the species Liriomyza trifolii.


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Leafminers Liriomyza bryoniae and L. trifolii (Diptera : Agromyzidae), their parasites and host plants by Oscar P. J. M. Minkenberg Download PDF EPUB FB2

They are highly polyphagous, especially L. trifolii which has a host range that includes over species in 28 plant families. The tomato leafminer, Liriomyza bryoniae (Kaltenbach), has a more limited distribution in Europe and Asia. Hymenopteran parasitoids of dipteran leafminers in Braconidae, Eulophidae, and Pteromalidae families usually.

Title: The leafminers, Liriomyza bryoniae and L. trifolii (Diptera: Agromyzidae), their parasites and host plants: a review. Author: Minkenberg, O.P.J.M., Lenteren Cited by: The current situation with regard to the control of Liriomyza bryoniae and L.

trifolii, pests of ornamental plants and vegetables throughout the world, is evaluated. The relationships between these agromyzids, their parasites, their host-plants and factors influencing these relationships are reviewed.

A list of parasites and predators is provided with notes on their by: Minkenberg OPJM () Life history of the agromyzid fly Liriomyza trifolii on tomato at different temperatures. Entomologia Expimentalis et Applicata –84 CrossRef Google Scholar Minkenberg OPJM, van Lenteren JC () The leafminers Liriomyza bryoniae and L.

trifolii (Diptera: Agromyzidae), their parasites and host plants: a review. Minkenberg, O.P.J.M. and van Lenteren, J. The leafminers Liriomyza bryoniae and L. trifolii, their parasites and host plants: a review.

Agricultural University Wageningen Papers Mou, B. and Ryder, E.J. Screening and breeding for resistance to leafminer (Liriomyza. Parrella, M. P., K. Robb, and J. Bethke. Influence of selected host plants on the biology of Liriomyza trifolii (Diptera: Agromyzidae). Annals of the Entomological Society of.

The leafminers Liriomyza bryoniae and L. trifolii (Diptera: Agromyzidae), their parasites and host plants: a review. Wageningen Agricultural University Papers 50 pp.

Murphy ST, LaSalle J. Balancing biological control strategies in the IPM of New World invasive Liriomyza leafminers in field vegetable crops. Biocontrol News and. 2 Biology of leafminers; data and assumptions used in the model. Life history data of leafminers have been collected by Minkenberg () for L.

trifolii and Minkenberg & Helderman () for L. bryoniae. Data are derived from these studies or original reports on which the mentioned studies are based. Data. Tokumaru, S., and Abe, Y. Effects of temperature and photoperiod on development and reproductive potential of Liriomyza sativae, L.

trifolii, and L. bryoniae (Diptera: Agromyzidae). Japanese Journal of Applied Entomology and Zoology Tran, D. Agromyzid leafminers and their parasitoids on vegetables in central Vietnam. Get this from a library. The leafminers Liriomyza bryoniae and L. trifolii (Diptera: Agromyzidae), their parasites and host plants: a revies.

[Oscar P J M Minkenberg; J C van Lenteren]. The seasonal prevalence of hymenopterous parasitoids of Liriomyza sativae Blanchard, L. trifolii (Burgess), and L. bryoniae (Kaltenbach) (Diptera: Agromyzidae) infesting commercially grown tomato plants was surveyed in two greenhouses in Kyoto Prefecture, Japan from to Opius sp.

(Braconidae) was predominant from May to June in and Liriomyza trifolii, known generally as the American serpentine leafminer or celery leafminer, is a species of leaf miner fly in the family Agromyzidae.

trifolii is a damaging pest, as it consumes and destroys produce and other plant products. It commonly infests greenhouses and is one of the three most-damaging leaf miners in existence today.

It is found in several countries around the. Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess), Liriomyza huidobrensis (Bran- chard), Liriomyza bryoniae (Kaltenbach), Liriomyza strigata (Meigen) and Liriomyza longei Frick [4, 5].

American serpentine leafminer Liriomyza trifolii. Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess) Diptera: Agromyzidae is a leafminer pest native to the New World that has been introduced into many countries in Europe, Africa, Asia and Oceania.L. trifolii has a vast host range including vegetables and ornamentals from about 50 genera in several economically important plant families.

Menken and Ulenberg () describe a method of distinguishing L. trifolii from L. bryoniae, L. huidobrensis, and L. sativae using allozyme variation patterns as revealed by gel electrophoresis. Adult L. trifolii is very small: mm body length, up to mm in female with wings mm.

The mesonotum is grey-black with a yellow blotch. Quarantine Liriomyza leaf minersall produce broken trails of insect debris within the mine, which may sometimes appear almost continuous and the mines often appear browner and dirtier than the mines of C.

syngenesiae. trifolii often produces a particularly convoluted, tightly coiled mine, which is usually found towards the top of the leaf. Liriomyza trifolii) and several other agromyzid pest leafminers (L. cicerina, L. huidobrensis, L. sativae, L. bryoniae and Chromatomyia horticola).

It provides guidelines for steps to be undertaken and considered when developing a Response Plan to this pest.

Any Response Plan developed using information in whole or. The leafminers Liriomyza bryoniae and L. trifolii (Diptera: Agromyzidae), their parasites and host plants: a review. Wageningen Agric. Univ. Papers 50 pp. Murphy ST, LaSalle J. Balancing biological control strategies in the IPM of New World invasive Liriomyza leafminers in field vegetable crops.

Biocontrol News and Information The host species attacked by Liriomyza sativae in Samoa are not recorded by Waterhouse and Norris in their book Biological Control Pacific Prospects.

However, Liriomyza trifolii attacks beans in Samoa, and beans, cabbage, celery, Chinese cabbage, pigeon pea, tomato (Photo 2) and watermelon in Tonga (see Fact Sheet no.

Liriomyza trifolii (Burgess), Liriomyza huidobrensis (Bran-chard), Liriomyza bryoniae (Kaltenbach), Liriomyza strigata (Meigen) and Liriomyza longei Frick [4, 5]. Believed to be of Neotropic origin, the geographical distribution of Liriomyza species was restricted to the New World until the mids.

As a result of anthropogenic activities. Eur. J. Entomol. (1):| DOI: /eje Exploitation of the serpentine leafminer Liriomyza trifolii and tomato leafminer ae (Diptera: Agromyzidae) by the parasitoid Gronotoma micromorpha (Hymenoptera: Eucoilidae) Yoshihisa ABE Laboratory of Applied Entomology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto Prefectural University, Shimogamo, KyotoJapan; e.Hymenopterous parasitoids of leafminers, Liriomyza sativae Blanchard (Diptera: Agromyzidae), L.

trifolii (Burgess), and L. bryoniae (Kaltenbach) infesting commercially grown vegetables and ornamental crops were occasionally surveyed in various locations in .ASADI et al. ;NOYES ). In Egypt, it was reported from Liriomyza cicerina (RONDANI) and L.

bryoniae (KALTENBACH) (El-SERWY ) and L. trifolii (BURGESS) (ABD-RABOU ). In .